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Donkeyman
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08-07-2019, 07:03 PM
11

Re: The rain Forest of Brazil

Originally Posted by The Artful Todger ->
The oceans provide HUGE CO2 sinks. That's often wrongly overlooked.
Dont they also produce oxygen as well as absorbing Co2
Todger? I read somewhere a while ago that certain types
of micro organisms living in the oceans actually have the
ability to process the Co2 into oxygen? Hence the ozone
smell you can sometimes detect when at the coast!
Perhaps we are talking of the same thing?

Regards Donkeyman!
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The Artful Todger
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08-07-2019, 08:06 PM
12

Re: The rain Forest of Brazil

Originally Posted by Donkeyman ->
Dont they also produce oxygen as well as absorbing Co2
Todger? I read somewhere a while ago that certain types
of micro organisms living in the oceans actually have the
ability to process the Co2 into oxygen? Hence the ozone
smell you can sometimes detect when at the coast!
Perhaps we are talking of the same thing?

Regards Donkeyman!
You're right that the CO2 sink is because of the extraction of carbon atoms releasing O2, however the smell encountered by the sea though called ozone actually isn't. It's dimethyl sulphide, a gas released by a bug!
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08-07-2019, 09:18 PM
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Re: The rain Forest of Brazil

So if we stand on the seashore and take a huge breath of sea air and say a loud Ahhhhh! we are inhaling a gas produced by a bug but if a fellow human does the same as that little bug you call him a dirty b+++++.
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08-07-2019, 10:41 PM
14

Re: The rain Forest of Brazil

Originally Posted by big ben ->
So if we stand on the seashore and take a huge breath of sea air and say a loud Ahhhhh! we are inhaling a gas produced by a bug but if a fellow human does the same as that little bug you call him a dirty b+++++.
If a human can produce the same gas then probably not!
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Donkeyman
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09-07-2019, 01:06 PM
15

Re: The rain Forest of Brazil

Originally Posted by The Artful Todger ->
You're right that the CO2 sink is because of the extraction of carbon atoms releasing O2, however the smell encountered by the sea though called ozone actually isn't. It's dimethyl sulphide, a gas released by a bug!
So is that good or bad Todge?
Because bi smells ok?
Most piosonous gas smells terrible? I suppose its a result
of evolution that animals have developed a dislike of harmful
products that smell that way?

Regards Donkeyman!
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Solasch
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12-07-2019, 03:58 PM
16

Re: The rain Forest of Brazil

Originally Posted by The Artful Todger ->
The oceans provide HUGE CO2 sinks. That's often wrongly overlooked.
Where do you think all that O2 comes from? Not the rain forest.
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Solasch
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12-07-2019, 04:23 PM
17

Re: The rain Forest of Brazil

Originally Posted by Donkeyman ->
Dont they also produce oxygen as well as absorbing Co2
Todger? I read somewhere a while ago that certain types
of micro organisms living in the oceans actually have the
ability to process the Co2 into oxygen? Hence the ozone
smell you can sometimes detect when at the coast!
Perhaps we are talking of the same thing?

Regards Donkeyman!
In the ocean massive amounts of plankton live. Plankton exists of one-cellular plants and animals. Fish live on it.
The plant plankton dissociates CO2 by a proces called fotosynthesis. From CO2 and H2O using light it produces glucose and oxygen. Green plants on land do the same.

In the beginning earth's atmosphere contained no oxygen. Almost all the surface was covered in water, with plankton. In billions of years that plankton produced the oxygen in our atmosphere.

Plants also produce oxygen, but to a lesser extend, and due to the sheer amount of plankton we still have oxygen to breathe. Even if all the plants on earth were to vanish we could live, as long as there is plankton in the oceans.
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12-07-2019, 04:27 PM
18

Re: The rain Forest of Brazil

Originally Posted by The Artful Todger ->
You're right that the CO2 sink is because of the extraction of carbon atoms releasing O2, however the smell encountered by the sea though called ozone actually isn't. It's dimethyl sulphide, a gas released by a bug!
You can smell ozone on land too. During and shortly after a thunderstorm.
The electric discharge of lightning makes the O2 in the air split in two O atoms. O is called ozone. It is highly reactive so short lived.
High in the atmosphere the radiation from space causes the same proces. There is a whole layer there: the famous ozone layer.
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Donkeyman
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13-07-2019, 10:02 AM
19

Re: The rain Forest of Brazil

Originally Posted by Solasch ->
In the ocean massive amounts of plankton live. Plankton exists of one-cellular plants and animals. Fish live on it.
The plant plankton dissociates CO2 by a proces called fotosynthesis. From CO2 and H2O using light it produces glucose and oxygen. Green plants on land do the same.

In the beginning earth's atmosphere contained no oxygen. Almost all the surface was covered in water, with plankton. In billions of years that plankton produced the oxygen in our atmosphere.

Plants also produce oxygen, but to a lesser extend, and due to the sheer amount of plankton we still have oxygen to breathe. Even if all the plants on earth were to vanish we could live, as long as there is plankton in the oceans.
What you describe above Solly is what l read a long time ago,
and my memories of this is what prompted me to join this
thread! Thanks for posting as you have refreshed my memory!
I also posed a question earlier about the problem of oceanic
warming and if it continues will it have any influence on the
function of oxygen production via oceans?
Perhaps either you or Todger have further info on this that
you would be willing to share on the forum?
If you could l would be grateful as l am very interested in
this sort of subject!

Regards Donkeyman!
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Solasch
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13-07-2019, 01:29 PM
20

Re: The rain Forest of Brazil

Originally Posted by Donkeyman ->
What you describe above Solly is what l read a long time ago,
and my memories of this is what prompted me to join this
thread! Thanks for posting as you have refreshed my memory!
I also posed a question earlier about the problem of oceanic
warming and if it continues will it have any influence on the
function of oxygen production via oceans?
Perhaps either you or Todger have further info on this that
you would be willing to share on the forum?
If you could l would be grateful as l am very interested in
this sort of subject!

Regards Donkeyman!
Temperature is of limited effect on plants. More important is the availability of water (no point for plankton) and light. The latter will be the first to be a limiting factor. Light has a limited penetration into water, depending on it's frequency (= colour). Luckily plants reflect green light (hence their colour) and absorb red. Red light is the part of sunlight that easily penetrates earth's atmosphere, so the cause for earth's warming, the CO2 blanket) has little effect.
All in all there will be plankton in the ocean long after mankind has succeeded in eradicating its self.
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