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Realist
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09-08-2018, 10:04 PM
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Re: GMO food

Swim is correct. Here, at least so far . . . . we have the luxury of products having to label GMO ingredients.

Americans on the other hand are sadly . . . Daffy Ducked.

Such labelling is not mandatory everywhere.

Monsanto will end up owning and controlling the food chain if the world stupidly allows them too.

People can not fight these power mad uber wealthy and powerful people.

What they can do is educate themselves and learn how to live naturally and with self-sufficiency. There's no doubt that ultimately the product in your stores and supermarkets WILL eventually be nasty GMO products. It is no use waiting until that happens. We need to learn and understand how to grow and propagate our own food before we get to that point.

Many perhaps think they know. How many of you grow your own vegetables? Potatoes, courgettes, beans, onions . . . all manner of veg and fruit.

But how do those people begin that process?

My guess is they buy seeds in packets or small seedling plants from nurseries.

So what is going to happen when you can no longer buy those seeds and seedling plants?

What you need to be able to do, is take the seeds from the vegetables you grew this year and treat them in the right way and store them in the right way so that they are then viable for next year.

This is not a straight forward as it may sound. Every vegetable has its own issues and each one has methods and processes that are needed to ensure you get viable seeds next year.

There are places you can do a course to learn this stuff. I recommend as many do that as possible because it's not going to be long before the only seeds you can buy commercially are crap seeds, GMO seeds.

This site is an extremely good resource for this stuff:

http://www.realseeds.co.uk/seedsavinginfo.html
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Bruv
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09-08-2018, 10:07 PM
12

Re: GMO food

Originally Posted by Silver Tabby ->
The farm shop where I buy my fresh fruit and vegs don't go in for GM foods. So I know I am safe there, Bruv, and I am a compulsive label reader these days. I don't buy 'ready meals' but I do buy tins of various kinds of beans - butter beans, kidney beans etc.,
You are safe then.
I hadn't realised there was a chance of GM ingredients in anything in the UK.
I seldom eat anything processed, other than cakes maybe, I shall take a more careful look at labels myself in future.
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10-08-2018, 12:01 AM
13

Re: GMO food

Here is another seed place that may interest some.

https://www.organiccatalogue.com/?gc...SAAEgJQ_PD_BwE


By the way, has anyone noticed some strawberries this year that appear very red and ripe, even soft, on the outside, yet have wide hard centres?
I am suspicious of what treatments they've had.

The strawberries in Morrisons have those tiny green & white packets of 'stay fresh' satchets in the boxes too.
Why?
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10-08-2018, 12:17 AM
14

Re: GMO food

Originally Posted by Bruv ->
You are safe then.
I hadn't realised there was a chance of GM ingredients in anything in the UK.
I seldom eat anything processed, other than cakes maybe, I shall take a more careful look at labels myself in future.
The top "big 3" crops to avoid are Maize/Corn and Soy and Cottonseed.

88% of Maize/Corn is GMO
93% of Soy is GMO
94% of Cotton is GMO

Those numbers are so high that I feel sure the GMO crops are infiltrating all manner of products worldwide. I don't trust labelling laws nor do I trust manufacturers so I avoid products with those ingredients.

BTW Cottonseed is used for vegetable oil, margarine or shortening production, or frying foods, such as potato chips.
Who knew?!
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10-08-2018, 06:42 AM
15

Re: GMO food

Originally Posted by Mups ->
Here is another seed place that may interest some.

https://www.organiccatalogue.com/?gc...SAAEgJQ_PD_BwE


By the way, has anyone noticed some strawberries this year that appear very red and ripe, even soft, on the outside, yet have wide hard centres?
I am suspicious of what treatments they've had.

The strawberries in Morrisons have those tiny green & white packets of 'stay fresh' satchets in the boxes too.
Why?
OFF topic

It was the weather..bad year for them and most of my ones died after producing very few fruits and the few that survived they did not grow any suckers.
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Meg
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10-08-2018, 08:56 AM
16

Re: GMO food

Hybrid crops and genetically modified crops are not the same to me. The first when done by man involves cross breeding and selection (which already occurs in nature) to retain, enhance or discard certain features. The latter is the manipulation of genes by man.



Originally Posted by Mups ->
By the way, has anyone noticed some strawberries this year that appear very red and ripe, even soft, on the outside, yet have wide hard centres?
I am suspicious of what treatments they've had.

The strawberries in Morrisons have those tiny green & white
Mups many strawberries sold in the shops these days have a hard centre core, that is down to the variety which is developed to be 'firm' in order to travel well and give a longer shelf life.

I lost my main strawberry crop , they ripened while I was away on holiday and the plants looked dead on my return. I cut back the perpetual strawberries (Mara de bois) and they are now flowering again and will fruit until the first frost so all is not lost .
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