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19-02-2019, 12:57 AM
21

Re: The Highway Code

Originally Posted by realspeed ->
Brake peddle travel can affect stopping distance as well as below
The performance of braking systems has increased massively over the years so the Highway Code braking distances are a load of old tosh and have been for years.
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19-02-2019, 08:36 AM
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Re: The Highway Code

Originally Posted by realspeed ->
I last read the Highway code in around 1962/3. Don't think much has changed as crashes still happen.

Brake peddle travel can affect stopping distance as well as below

As for tyres are they talking about radial-crossply- all terrain-snow- road type, let alone what classification the tyre is rated at, etc .Stopping distance alters on the type of tyre used as well as if a car has disc or drum brakes. Not only that but if the road is a tarmac or concrete . Consistancy of the tarmac also applies as to its ability to slow down a car

So stopping distance is a load of tosh

Still got this one from 1971 my second little red book
Don't have the very first one from 1962/3

But the death toll has come down from 8K in the sixties to 1756 last year.

Stopping distances So if you are doing 30 miles an hour and a child runs out in front of you, you brake and stop 3 feet before the child and so you do not hit He/She

If you are doing 31 miles an hour it takes another 8 feet to stop and the child dies...so as you say stooping distances are a load of tosh.
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21-02-2019, 04:25 PM
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Re: The Highway Code

When I passed my test in 1955 the highway code was a rather slender booklet if in recall correctly. Remember the old slowing down and turning left hand signals?
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21-02-2019, 04:31 PM
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Re: The Highway Code

I wonder how well cyclists would do on that test?
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21-02-2019, 05:07 PM
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Re: The Highway Code

Many drivers are overconfident both of their own skills and in the performance of their own vehicle. The Highway Code "stopping distances" are only a guide - in the event of road incident, the real time to stop will vary greatly and one of the variables which will affect real stopping distance is "thinking time":

https://www.rac.co.uk/drive/advice/l...ing-distances/

A driver’s age, how awake they are and if they’ve consumed any drugs or alcohol can all influence how quickly it takes them to react.

Using a mobile phone rather than concentrating on the road can have devastating effects on a driver’s stopping distance – just a few seconds glancing at your phone can add an football pitch to your overall stopping distance at motorway speeds. If the traffic ahead has stopped, that could ruin your day very quickly.

Other distractions in the car – such as loud music and passengers – can also affect the thinking time before you apply the brakes.
Weather and road conditions can massively increase real "stopping distances":

In poor weather conditions, a car’s total stopping distance is likely to be longer for a number of reasons. For a start, poor visibility might mean the driver takes longer to react – increasing his/her thinking distance. But slippery roads caused by rain, snow or ice will also extend the braking distance.

Research suggests braking distances can be doubled in wet conditions – and multiplied by 10 on snow or ice. That means, in the snow, it could take you further than the length of seven football pitches to stop from 70mph.
While many modern cars may indeed be able to stop in shorter distances than the official Highway Code states, a car’s condition can also have an impact.

For example, cars equipped with budget tyres can take an extra 14 metres to stop from 70mph in wet conditions compared to cars with ‘premium brand’ tyres, or five metres in the dry.

Research has also found that tyres on the legal limit of 1.6mm tread can need an extra 60% more road to stop compared to brand new tyres.
"Sticking to the limit" for HC stopping distances may, sometimes, may not be far enough .....

Of course, "experienced" drivers will say "I make allowances for all conditions" but are the drivers in front and behind making the same allowances .....
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21-02-2019, 06:16 PM
26

Re: The Highway Code

Originally Posted by scot37 ->
When I passed my test in 1955 the highway code was a rather slender booklet if in recall correctly. Remember the old slowing down and turning left hand signals?
Yes!
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21-02-2019, 07:16 PM
27

Re: The Highway Code

Originally Posted by scot37 ->
When I passed my test in 1955 the highway code was a rather slender booklet if in recall correctly. Remember the old slowing down and turning left hand signals?
Originally Posted by Pyxell ->
Yes!
These are from the 1930's:



There are the ones still (occasionally) taught but rarely tested:



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23-02-2019, 06:59 PM
28

Re: The Highway Code

Originally Posted by Omah ->
These are from the 1930's:



There are the ones still (occasionally) taught but rarely tested:



Spot on.

I had to do the same.

Do it these days I might get arrested by the police thinking I am drunk
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24-03-2019, 11:25 AM
29

Re: The Highway Code

The modern HC is a most unsatisfactory document.

It tells you, when approaching a roundabout, to "select the most appropriate lane". Back in the day, it used to contain principles for determining WHICH lane that was, with diagrams showing the line you should drive through the roundabout. That was helpful ... the modern tosh is not.

(Actually, of course, you can no longer drive those lines through most roundabouts, because they have painted white lines round the roundabouts which "spin you outwards" to your exit ... and the line they take is totally different!)
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24-03-2019, 11:50 AM
30

Re: The Highway Code

last one i read was in about 1961/2 for the driving test. Do they still use a burning torch for school signs???
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